5. New child tax credit payments start this month.

Updated: May 13


Revenue Service and the Treasury Department announced today that millions of American families have started receiving monthly Child Tax Credit payments as direct deposits begin posting in bank accounts and checks arrive in mailboxes.

This first batch of advance monthly payments worth roughly $15 billion reached about 35 million families today across the country. About 86% were sent by direct deposit.

The payments will continue each month. The IRS urged people who normally aren't required to file a tax return to explore the tools available on IRS.gov. These tools can help determine eligibility for the advance Child Tax Credit or help people file a simplified tax return to sign up for these payments as well as Economic Impact Payments, and other credits you may be eligible to receive.

Under the American Rescue Plan, each payment is up to $300 per month for each child under age 6 and up to $250 per month for each child ages 6 through 17. Normally, anyone who receives a payment this month will also receive a payment each month for the rest of 2021 unless they unroll. Besides the July 15 payment, payment dates are: Aug. 13, Sept. 15, Oct. 15, Nov. 15 and Dec. 15.

Here are further details on these payments:

  • Families will see the direct deposit payments in their accounts starting today, July 15. For those receiving payment by paper check, they should remember to take into consideration the time it takes to receive it by mail.

  • Payments went to eligible families who filed 2019 or 2020 income tax returns.

  • Tax returns processed by June 28 are reflected in these payments. This includes people who don't typically file a return, but during 2020 successfully registered for Economic Impact Payments using the IRS Non-Filers tool or in 2021 successfully used the Non-filer Sign-up Tool for Advance CTC, also on IRS.gov.

  • Payments are automatic. Aside from filing a tax return, including a simplified return from the Non-Filer Sign-Up tool, families don't have to do anything if they are eligible to receive monthly payments.

Additional information is available on a special Advance Child Tax Credit 2021 page, designed to provide the most up-to-date information about the credit and the advance payments.

Source


IRS is required to pay half the child credit in advance through payments to be sent each month or so to qualifying families, beginning sometime this summer.

It will determine eligibility for the credit and payments based on 200 or 2019 returns.

The amount a family will get each month is based on AGI, the number of children and the ages of the kids. Families who qualify for the full $3000 or $3600 credit could see checks of $250 or $300 per child for six months. Those with higher incomes who qualify for the $2,000 credit could get monthly payments of $167 per child.

You will need to let IRS know of changes to your family circumstances or AGI. IRS will develop an online tool so that you can update your income, marital status and the number of your qualifying children. You can opt out of advance payments on the portal and instead take the full credit on your 2021 return

The payments are advantages of the 2021 child tax credit and aren't taxable.

On your 2021 Form 1040, you'll reconcile the payments you got with your actual credit.

Some people who receive over payments needn't repay the excess to IRS.

Working parents get a higher child and dependent care credit for 2021

of as much as $4,000 for one child and $8,000 for two r more kids... up from $1,050

and $2,100 for 2020. Parents with up to $125,000 of AGI are eligible or the full credit.

Taxpayers with AGIs between $125,000 and $500,000 t a partial credit.

Working parents can contribute more to dependent care FSAs 2021.

They can put in up to $10,500 of pretax wages...up from $5,000...if the plan allows.


Make sure to keep accurate records for all advanced payments you received and bring them to your accountant while preparing 2021 taxes to eliminate all future delays and inconsistencies.




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